Immigration Issues

Population and Environment

Environmental Impact (2009)
We won't be able to meet today's environmental priorities if our population continues to grow at the staggering rates created by mass immigration.

The United States Is Already Overpopulated (2009)
Because of the abundance of our nation, we have long been careless about out level of consumption, but it is the precipitous rise in the U.S. population over the last four decades that has resulted in our outstripping of our national resources. We are living beyond our means and are doing so increasingly as our population expands. This is a serious problem with major implications for future generations.

Urban Sprawl (2009)
Farmland, forests, and other open space is being lost to urban population settlement.

Traffic Congestion (2009)
More immigration means more congested highways.

The Population-Environment Connection (2009)
Describing the disjoint between environmental priorities and immigration fueled population growth.

Rating Environmental Groups on Immigration (2009)
Environmentalists agree that population growth is a serious issue. But how do they respond when Census Bureau data shows that two-thirds of U.S. population growth is due to immigration?

More is Not Necessarily Better (2009)
As an area becomes more populated, its infrastructure starts straining under the weight of all the new people who must be served. Police forces, roads, and schools no longer satisfy the demands of a growing population, and farmland and forests are sacrificed to strip malls and housing developments.

Immigration, Energy and the Environment (2009)
Energy consumption is a factor of both per capita use and population size. Population size in the United States is largely an issue currently shaped by immigration. U.S. energy consumption and the resulting environmental impact from the production of greenhouse gasses have been steadily increasing even though per capita consumption has been decreasing. Reversing this trend requires reducing immigration.

Freshwater Limits (2009)
Aquifers are being depleted as population grows.

Environmentalists Support Immigration Reform (2009)
The key to controlling environmental damage is to stabilize our population a size sustainable by our environment and natural resources--but high immigration is working at odds with efforts to keep overpopulation under control.

Energy Use, CO2 Emission and Immigration (2009)
Energy consumption is a factor of both per capita use and population size. Population size in the United States is largely an issue currently shaped by immigration. U.S. energy consumption and the resulting environmental impact from the production of greenhouse gasses have been steadily increasing even though per capita consumption has been decreasing. Reversing this trend requires reducing immigration.

Population Growth (2008)
Immigration adds more than half of the annual U.S. population increase, while communities struggleing to provide services to existing residents.

Q&A on the Environmental Connection
How does large-scale immigration impact population growth, water and energy supplies, urban sprawl, and other environmental issues?