Population and Environment Publications

U.S. Immigration and the Environment
U.S. Immigration and the Environment Exploding U.S. population levels were a primary concern among enivronmentalists at the birth of the movement in the 1970s, but those roots have all but withered. Unfortunately, the national environmental movement will no longer talk about U.S. population, let alone immigration’s role. Many staff and volunteers for environmental organizations know little of the history and are reluctant to acknowledge the impact of immigration on the nation’s carrying capacity.

Running Dry: Looming Water Shortages in The United States (2012)
Running Dry: Looming Water Shortages in The United States (2012) Despite tremendous gains in water conservation over the last several decades, Americans are using water at an unsustainable rate. The reason: Population growth. Some areas of the United States are already experiencing acute water shortages, a trend that will spread throughout the country in the coming years. Compounding the problem are outdated public water systems that pose health and safety hazards to millions of Americans. If we don't reduce our usage, make the necessary investment in repairing our failing public water systems, and work to achieve population stability, chronic water shortages are years, not decades, away.

A Change of Plans: Rethinking Rapid Growth in a Finite World
A Change of Plans: Rethinking Rapid Growth in a Finite World Americans have been conditioned to believe that population growth is always an indicator of economic prosperity, and that communities must grow in size to maintain their vitality. Locally powerful special interests like the real estate and construction industries promote and reinforce this idea. They lobby intensely for pro-growth initiatives that funnel tax money into development projects that benefit only a small minority of well-connected elites. This report demonstrates that growth in size is not an effective way to promote economic wellbeing, and that the policies cities use to promote growth harm the economy even further.

Immigration, Population Growth and the Chesapeake Bay
Immigration, Population Growth and the Chesapeake Bay A catastrophe, in the making over the course of many decades, is threatening the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Right now, the Chesapeake Bay is at a tipping point. Its condition has deteriorated to the extent that the Bay may never recover from the damage already inflicted upon it by overpopulation and overdevelopment on its coastal areas and vital tributaries. Even worse, there appears to be no serious effort to end future growth in the watershed.

The Environmentalist's Guide to a Sensible Immigration Policy (2010)
The Environmentalist's Guide to a Sensible Immigration Policy (2010) Can you imagine discussing the U.S. trade deficit without mentioning China? Or analyzing the looming Social Security crisis with no mention of retiring baby boomers? Well, that's what is happening when environmentalists discuss the problem of urban sprawl or efforts to reduce U.S. carbon emissions without mentioning immigration and its enormous impact on population growth.

Immigration, Energy and the Environment
Immigration, Energy and the Environment Energy consumption is a factor of both per capita use and population size. Population size in the United States is largely an issue currently shaped by immigration. U.S. energy consumption and the resulting environmental impact from the production of greenhouse gasses have been steadily increasing even though per capita consumption has been decreasing. Reversing this trend requires reducing immigration.

U.S. Immigration and Population Growth (2008)
U.S. Immigration and Population Growth (2008) The U.S. population increase from immigration between 2000 and 2006 was more than double the increase in the native-born population. The United States is on a population growth trajectory that -- if continued -- could result in adding another 300 million people over the next 70 years. In addition to the enormous burden this implies for our already shaky infrastructure, it has enormous implications on vital resources -- especially water and food supplies. This study focuses on the current population trend and provides a state-by-state look at the role of immigration in population growth.